Considering the role of culture on asthma self-management behaviour : using the Bangladeshi and Pakistani exemplar populations (2024)

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NPJ primary care respiratory medicine

Interventions to enhance the adoption of asthma self-management behaviour in the South Asian and African American population: a systematic review

2018 •

Salina Ahmed

South Asian and other minority communities suffer poorer asthma outcomes, have a higher rate of unscheduled care and benefit less from most existing self-management interventions when compared to the majority population. Possible reasons for these differences include failure to implement asthma self-management strategies, or that strategies implemented were inappropriate for their needs; alternatively, they may relate to the minority and/or lower socioeconomic status of these populations. We aimed to synthesise evidence from randomised controlled trials for asthma self-management in South Asian and Black populations from different sociocultural contexts, and identify barriers and facilitators to implementing self-management. We systematically searched eight electronic databases, and research registers, and manually searched relevant journals and reference lists of reviews. Seventeen trials met the inclusion criteria and were analysed narratively. We found two culturally targeted int...

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British Journal of Health Psychology

Developing theory‐based asthma self‐management interventions for South Asians and African Americans: A systematic review

2021 •

Salina Ahmed

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BMC Medical Research Methodology

A structured collaborative approach to intervention design using a modified intervention mapping approach: a case study using the Management and Interventions for Asthma (MIA) project for South Asian children

Monica Lakhanpaul

Background To describe how using a combined approach of community-based participatory research and intervention mapping principles could inform the development of a tailored complex intervention to improve management of asthma for South Asian (SA) children; Management and Interventions for Asthma (MIA) study. Methods A qualitative study using interviews, focus groups, workshops, and modified intervention mapping procedures to develop an intervention planning framework in an urban community setting in Leicester, UK. The modified form of intervention mapping (IM) included: systematic evidence synthesis; community study; families and healthcare professionals study; and development of potential collaborative intervention strategies. Participants in the community study were 63 SA community members and 12 key informants; in-depth semi-structured interviews involved 30 SA families, 14 White British (WB) families and 37 Healthcare Professionals (HCPs) treating SA children living with asthma...

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Health Services and Delivery Research

The use of a collaborative structured methodology for the development of a multifaceted intervention programme for the management of asthma (the MIA project), tailored to the needs of children and families of South Asian origin: a community-based, participatory study

2014 •

Monica Lakhanpaul

BackgroundAsthma is one of the most common chronic childhood illnesses in the UK. South Asian children are more likely to suffer from their asthma and be admitted to hospital. While this inequality needs to be addressed, standard behaviour-change interventions are known to be less successful in minority ethnic groups. Evidence suggests a need to enhance services provided to ethnic minority communities by developing culturally sensitive tailored interventions.ObjectivesThe Management and Interventions for Asthma (MIA) project aimed to test an iterative multiphase participatory approach to intervention development underpinned by the socioecological model of health, producing an intervention-planning framework and enhancing an evidence-based understanding of asthma management in South Asian and White British children.DesignInterviews and focus groups facilitated by community facilitators (CFs) were used to explore knowledge and perceptions of asthma among South Asian communities, child...

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The Diabetes Educator

Evaluation of a Community Health Worker Pilot Intervention to Improve Diabetes Management in Bangladeshi Immigrants With Type 2 Diabetes in New York City

2013 •

Runi Mukherji

Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore the impact and feasibility of a pilot Community Health Worker (CHW) intervention to improve diabetes management among Bangladeshi-American individuals with type 2 diabetes living in New York City. Methods Participants were recruited at clinic- and community-based venues. The intervention consisted of 6 monthly, CHW-facilitated group sessions on topics related to management of diabetes. Surveys were collected at baseline and follow-up time points. Study outcomes included clinical, behavioral, and satisfaction measures for participants, as well as qualitative measures from CHWs. Results Improvements were seen in diabetes knowledge, exercise and diet to control diabetes, frequency of checking feet, medication compliance, and self-efficacy of health and physical activity from baseline to 12 months. Additionally, there were decreases in A1C, weight, and body mass index. Program evaluation revealed a high acceptability of the intervention, a...

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Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

Cultural Differences in Psychosis: The Role of Causal Beliefs and Stigma in White British and South Asians

2019 •

aisha Mirza

While previous research has demonstrated the negative impact of stigma in individuals with mental health problems, little is known about cross-cultural differences in experiences and explanations of mental health, in particular in young people, despite the first episode of psychosis often occurring in adolescence. Aim of this study was to examine cultural differences in causal beliefs and stigma toward mental health, in particular psychosis. White British and South Asian young people ( N = 128) from two schools and colleges in the United Kingdom, aged 16 to 20 years, completed a cross-sectional survey. Results revealed significant associations between ethnic group and our dependent measures. White British reported more previous contact with a mental health service as well as with people with mental health problems than South Asians. They also reported lower stigma in form of a greater intentions to engage in contact with people with mental health problems. Furthermore, South Asians ...

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Interventions to improve the uptake of breast, cervical and bowel cancer screening in South Asian women living in high income countries

2017 •

Jo Brett

Objectives: The aim of this review was to identify the cultural, social, structural and behavioural factors that influence asymptomatic breast and cervical cancer screening attendance in South Asian populations, in order to improve uptake and propose priorities for further research. Design: A systematic review of the literature for inductive, comparative, prospective and intervention studies. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE/In-Process; Web of Science; EMBASE; SCOPUS; CENTRAL; CDSR; CINAHL; PsycINFO and PsycARTICLES from database inception to 23 January 2018. The review included studies on the cultural, social, structural and behavioural factors that influence asymptomatic breast and cervical cancer screening attendance and cervical smear testing (Papanicolaou test) in South Asian populations and those published in the English language. The Framework Analytic method was used and themes were drawn out following the Thematic Analysis method. Settings: Asymptomatic breast o...

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Biopsychosocial Approaches to Understanding Health in South Asian Americans

Psychological Models of Health

2018 •

Casey Batterbee

The purpose of this chapter is to provide a brief overview of recognized models of health (Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behavior, Health Locus of Control, Transtheoretical Model of Health Behavior Change) and psychological intervention originating from South Asian culture (mindfulness meditation, yoga, transcendental meditation, prayer) with the exception of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Given the increasing population of South Asian Americans and cultural differences in their health beliefs and behavior, it becomes imperative to discuss the suitability of implementing Western-influenced models and intervention among ethnic populations. Indeed, research emphasizes the importance of cultural sensitivity when assessing and treating either physical and/or mental health issues among South Asian American patients. Overall, through increasing awareness of the existing models of health and their weaknesses in application to South Asian Americans, identifying biopsychosocial factors unique to this population’s culture, and examining the existing forms of intervention and therapy indigenous to South Asians, researchers and practitioners can begin to create culturally adaptive and individualized treatments and models targeted towards the improvement of South Asian American health. This chapter aims to support the contention that the biopsychosocial approach to health may be especially useful among ethnic populations and improving the trajectory of health (studies, treatment, etc.). Research findings and descriptions regarding the mentioned models of health and intervention are discussed.

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Experiences of Ethnic Minority Patients Who Are Living with a Primary Bowel Condition or Bowel-Related Symptoms of Other Chronic Diseases: A Systematic Review

2021 •

Salina Ahmed

Background: Prevalence of chronic gastrointestinal diseases has been rising amongst ethnic minority populations in Western countries, despite the first-generation migrants originating from countries of low prevalence. Differences caused by genetic, environmental, cultural, and religious factors in each context may contribute towards shaping experiences of ethnic minority individuals living with primary bowel conditions. This review aimed to explore the experiences of ethnic minority patients’ living with chronic bowel illnesses and bowel-related symptoms of other chronic diseases. Methods: We systematically searched for qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods studies on eight electronic databases and manually searched reference lists of frequently cited papers. Fifteen papers met the inclusion criteria: focussing on inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, coeliac disease and prostate cancer survivors experiencing bowel symptoms. Results: Core themes were narrative...

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BMC Public Health

A systematic review of explanatory factors of barriers and facilitators to improving asthma management in South Asian children

2014 •

Monica Lakhanpaul

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Considering the role of culture on asthma self-management behaviour : using the Bangladeshi and Pakistani exemplar populations (2024)
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